Ten Films I've Already Seen That You Should Really Try To Catch At The London Film Festival

London Film FestivalThe London Film Festival line-up was announced this week and it looks to be one of their strongest line-ups yet, with a number of highly anticipated films.

I'm lucky enough to have seen quite a few titles from the line-up previously and so I can already recommend ten films well worth seeing at the London Film Festival this October.

BFI members booking opens on the 12th of September at 9:30am and general booking begins on the 20th of September at 12pm.

Here are the ten films I can already vouch for.

Inside Llewyn Davis

It's been a few months since I saw Inside Llewyn Davis and it's really stuck with me ever since. There is one moment in particular that returns to my mind again and again, a profound moment for the title character but one that is played with so much subtly and understatement by the Coen brothers. I'm pretty convinced that Inside Llewyn Davis is something of a subdued masterpiece and I can't wait to see it again.

Inside Llewyn Davis is playing at LFF on the 15th, 17th and 19th of October.

Blue is the Warmest Colour

Abdellatif Kechiche's Palme d'Or winning three hour coming of age story is an extraordinarily moving film and one of the best relationships dramas I've seen in some time. This was the talk of Cannes and will undoubtedly be a significant talking point at the London Film Festival in October.

Blue is the Warmest Colour is playing at the LFF on the 14th and 17th of October.

Only Lovers Left Alive

Jim Jarmusch riffs on literary giants in this meandering, but never dull, art rock vampire flick. Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton are sweet, witty and highly amusing as the two vampires killing time and looking for blood.

Here are a couple of clips.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-Eu5sevl7c[/youtube]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oocO91Npz2I[/youtube]

Only Lovers Left Alive is playing at the LFF on the 19th and 20th of October.

Nebraska

Bruce Dern's minimal but highly effective performance as an elderly man who believes he's won a million dollars is already getting talked up for awards consideration but Payne's smart writing also shines in this excellent, stripped back small town family story.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgvSCimK5k4[/youtube]

Nebraska is playing at the LFF on the 11th, 12th and 15th of October.

Like Father, Like Son

Hirokazu Koreeda's tale of two children switched at birth is sublime. Filled with tender and beautiful humanist observations. Koreeda at his best.

Like Father, Like Son is playing at the LFF on the 12th, 14th and 15th of October.

The Past

Asghar Farhadi's follow-up to A Separation is full of complex familial relationships and tense kitchen conversations. Berenice Bejo is particularly astounding and the way in which her character changes, often mid scene, is remarkable to watch.

The Past is playing at the LFF on the 17th and 18th of October.

Closed Curtain

Frustrating in a purposeful and meaningful way, Jafar Panahi's Closed Curtain is a quiet cry for help, a subdued howl of rage and a fascinating cinematic riddle.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2-F3ksAhl4[/youtube]

Closed Curtain is playing at the LFF on the 13th and 16th of October.

All Is Lost

Robert Redford is superb in this one-hander from Margin Call director J.C. Chandor. Lost at seam, Redford's character just tries to stay alive, which he does with meticulous attention to detail and real tenacity. The emotional resonance of the film's final scenes hit me like a tanker but the significance of a number of the smaller details also raise a number of fascinating questions about the modern world.

All is Lost is playing at the LFF on the 12th, 13th and 14th of October.

Heli

A bleak and gruelling experience Heli is not for the fainthearted. Those able to stomach the more difficult scenes of torture and violence, though, will be rewarded, as this film is a powerful piece of filmmaking.

Heli is playing at the LFF on the 16th and 19th of October.

Jodorowsky's Dune

A fine document of what could well be the greatest film never made. Using a variety of different documentary devices and a mixture of voices director Frank Pavich explores Alejandro Jodorwosky's attempts to make a film adaptation of Frank Herbet's Dune and the influence that this unfinished film is still having today.

Jodorowsky's Dune is playing at the LFF on the 9th, 12th and 14th of October.

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About Craig Skinner

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