"Life on Mars" Series 3 Happening; Set in 70s, 80s & Today [REPORT]

BBC's Life on Mars appears to have a few more lives left in it, at least according to series co-creator Matthew Graham. During a Twitter Q&A in support of an online rewatch of the original two seasons, Graham revealed that Life on Mars will be returning for a third and final seaason. Of special note to fans is its setting, which Graham describes as being "set partially in the 70s, partially in the 80s and mostly in an alternate now."

life on mars
BBC

In the announcement, Graham also reassured fans who might have concerns about their favorite series returning, adding, "We would never make another Mars unless we really had something to say and could push the envelope all over again. Finally, we have something." The season is expected to consist of four or five episodes, with a possible show-within-a-show format involving a show called Tyler: Murder Division.

Consisting of two seasons and airing on the BBC between 2006 and 2007, Life on Mars tells the story of a detective left in critical condition after a car accident ony to find as aspect of himself transported back in time to 1970's Manchester. Out-of-time DI Sam Tyler (Doctor Who's John Simm) and his rough-but-fair boss DCI Gene Hunt (Philip Glenister) won over viewers from the start, as did the show's soundtrack, attention to detail, and infectious overarching mythology. In 2008, spinoff series Ashes to Ashes with Keeley Hawes premiered and featured Life on Mars characters characters of Hunt, Ray Carling (Dean Andrews), and Chris Skelton (Marshall Lancaster).

While vague on exactly who from previous casts would make the return, Graham did reference DC Annie Cartwright (Liz White) and DCI Derek Litton (Lee Ross) before taking a page from the Marvel Studios playbook: "When you wonder who will be coming back for The Final Chapter – think 'Avengers Assemble'." That said, there's one name he didn't hesitate to drop when discussing the new season's theme: "There are bad things and there are monsters. These things are real. But to get to you they have to get through the Guv [Gene Hunt]. And the Guv is putting his driving gloves on."

The Guardian reached out to the BBC for comment, confirmation.

About Ray Flook

Serving as Television Editor since 2018, Ray began five years earlier as a contributing writer/photographer before being brought on board as staff in 2017.

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