The Falcon and Winter Soldier Showrunners on Sharon Carter's Dark Path

In the constant battle between good versus evil in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, some of the casualties aren't always so obvious. Some can take the form of the forgotten who are forced to forge their own path to survive and sometimes it ends up twisting their moral fiber as is the case of former S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Sharon Carter played by Emily VanCamp. Abandoned by the government she once served for daring to take the side of Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), she became a fugitive from the world stage and as we found out in The Falcon and the Winter Soldier survived as a dealer in the fictional mecca of Madripoor. Unbeknownst to the heroes Sam (Anthony Mackie) and Bucky (Sebastian Stan), Sharon's hands got a lot dirtier since becoming the Power Broker, the one responsible for funding the latest batch of super soldiers that ended up as the Flag Smashers.  Kari Skogland, Malcolm Spellman, and producers Nate Moore and Zoie Nagelhout spoke to Entertainment Weekly about Sharon's path to the dark side and what's to come.

Falcon and Winter Soldier Showrunners on Sharon Carter's Dark Path
Photo by Chuck Zlotnick/Marvel Studios

"[Sharon's actions] felt like an organic move," Moore said. "When last we saw Sharon in Captain America: Civil War (2016), she swiped Steve Rogers' shield and Sam's Falcon wings, but doing so meant she had to go on the run from the government she served for years. You go, 'What would happen to that character?' inspiration came from a '90s Captain America comic where Sharon had been left out in the cold by S.H.I.E.L.D. for years and she came back super-salty." Moore admitted Sharon got lost in the shuffle despite the efforts of Avengers: Infinity War and Endgame directors Anthony and Joe Russo along with screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely to get her more involved. "Sharon has been f***ed by all the institutions that she worked for, that protected her," Falcon and Winter Soldier writer Malcolm Spellman said. "They completely abandoned her and, in fact, were going after her. They put her in an awful position. We knew we could either be fake and say she's just been hiding out, or we could say, Sharon, who had a very youthful quality to her, grew up because of what these people did to her and the position they forced her in."

The Falcon and the Winter Soldier
Caption: (L-R): Falcon/Sam Wilson (Anthony Mackie), Sharon Carter/Agent 13 (Emily Van Camp) and Winter Soldier/Bucky Barnes (Sebastian Stan) in Marvel Studios' THE FALCON AND THE WINTER SOLDIER exclusively on Disney+. Photo by Chuck Zlotnick. ©Marvel Studios 2021. All Rights Reserved. Byline: Chuck Zlotnick. Copyright: ©Marvel Studios 2021. All Rights Reserved.

How The Falcon and the Winter Soldier Addresses Sharon Carter

Once the writers and showrunners mapped Sharon's story, it was a matter of when to reveal it. "We had to decide where to unfurl that, and we played around with all the different places of it. We tried a few things before we landed to where that was," director Kari Skogland said. It was decided in the finale "One World, One People", the reveal was made during Sharon and Karli's (Erin Kellyman) fight and subsequent involvement by Cap Sam. As Karli and Sam got into it, the Broker saw her opportunity and fatally shot Karli. With the announcement of Captain America 4, nothing is confirmed other than Spellman's involvement. Nagelhout offered what could be in Sharon's future. "I think she's such an interesting character. It felt like, in a story where we're dissecting the shield and that legacy, to have a character come in with a point of view that has changed… that has created a very interesting duality in her. I don't think she's all bad, I don't think she's all good. I think she lives in a middle ground that is really compelling. To get to explore that character further and what shades of gray she might drift between could be really interesting." The Falcon and the Winter Soldier is currently streaming on Disney+.

About Tom Chang

I'm a follower of pop culture from gaming, comics, sci-fi, fantasy, film, and TV for over 30 years. I grew up reading magazines like Starlog, Mad, and Fangoria. As a writer for over 10 years, Star Wars was the first sci-fi franchise I fell in love with. I'm a nerd-of-all-trades.