The Bleeding Cool TV Top 10 Best of 2018 Countdown: #4 GLOW

"Television is becoming a collage – there are so many channels that you move through them making a collage yourself. In that sense, everyone sees something a bit different."

– David Hockney

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There was a time when working for television was labelled a "demotion," a professional death sentence for movie stars whose careers were on an irreparable descent.

Today, we have Meryl Streep joining HBO's Big Little LiesIdris Elba returning to BBC One as DCI John Luther, and Henry Cavill beginning work on Netflix's fantasy series The Witcher.

There was a time when it was thought for a show to succeed, it needed to start every September, end every April/May, and run at least 20 episodes per season.

Today, fans wait over 18 months for an eight-episode season of Game of Thrones, and remain loyal to BBC One's Sherlock–even after a two-year break between seasons.

There was a time when television meant "The Big Three," HBO went off-air at 11 pm, and "water cooler" moments before the VCR could be a very select club at the office.

Today, cable and streaming have turned "The Big Three" into "The Big 333;" with the DVR, on-demand, and binge-watching making any time a great time to talk television.

Yes, it can be said that "The Platinum Age of Television" comes with a price: as more shows saturate the pop culture landscape, the more difficult it is for individual shows to stand out. When choosing our top selections, it felt like we were trying to find ten needles in a pile of needles–and nearly as painful when you see later in the countdown what didn't make the cut.

But Bleeding Cool prefers an embarrassment of programming riches to our television cupboards being bare; so here's a look at the ten shows we feel best represented a medium ripe with possibilities in 2018–as well as a few words on why the series was so deserving.

#4 GLOW (Netflix)

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Netflix

So a Netflix series about a long-defunct (and mostly forgotten unless you're into bygone wrestling eras) women's pro-wrestling league from the 1980s – doesn't sound like the kind of thing that will keep drawing you back from episode to episode, but showrunners Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch have created an interesting blend of characters and drives as the cast tries to find their way through a post-Women's Lib era and into acceptance as serious performenrs rather than a sideshow curiosity.

The engagement comes from their out-of-the-ring drives and personalityes with sharp writing makes Glow a regulaar addition to any current Netflix binge-worthy list.

– Bill Watters

GLOW Season 2: As Ruth (Alison Brie) and Debbie (Betty Gilpin) settle into the day-to-day of making a season of TV together, they confront lingering issues at the heart of their friendship. Sam (Marc Maron) is still Sam, but now he has a teenage daughter living with him and twenty episodes to churn out. The wrestling is harder, the stakes are higher and the hair is even bigger.

About Ray Flook

Serving as Television Editor since 2018, Ray began five years earlier as a contributing writer/photographer before being brought on board as staff in 2017.

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