Nick Spencer Explains Why It's OK For Marvel To Spoil Secret Empire

Spoilers are bad. They ruin people's enjoyment of comics, and they undermine the efforts of creators to tell compelling stories. Unless the spoilers are coming from Marvel itself, through sanctioned articles on mainstream media outlets. Then, the spoilers are good. Or, at least, inevitable.

Just ask Secret Empire writer Nick Spencer, who responded on Twitter to Marvel spoiling the ending to Secret Empire in the New York Times.

https://twitter.com/nickspencer/status/902270594061701120

https://twitter.com/nickspencer/status/902271852302671872

One idea: don't spoil the ending in the New York Times. But that ship has sailed. One intrepid follower had a response for Spencer: Bleeding Cool Spoilermonger-in-Chief Rich Johnston.

Did you know that Rich Johnston and superstar writer Kieron Gillen are such good friends they're on a first-name basis? In case you didn't, Rich reminds us as often as possible.

Meanwhile, Marvel executive Tom Brevoort took a shot at Johnston's motives for decrying spoilers, but left himself open to the exact same criticism:

Spencer moved on to rehashing one of his classic talking points about Secret Empire: that people who don't like it simply don't understand what it's trying to say.

https://twitter.com/nickspencer/status/902339797296877568

https://twitter.com/nickspencer/status/902340737190133760

https://twitter.com/nickspencer/status/902341424674246656

https://twitter.com/nickspencer/status/902342964080369664

https://twitter.com/nickspencer/status/902343536191823873

 

https://twitter.com/nickspencer/status/902344435526123520

It's true. Spencer has been very clear about what he intended Secret Empire to say. He's got thousands of tweets on the subject to back that up. But does what Spencer says on Twitter really matter, or is it what's in the actual comic book that counts? If readers are consistently getting something different out of reading the book, is that their fault for failing to study Nick Spencer's tweets, or should the story's message have been clearer?

Those lofty questions are above our pay grade, unfortunately. What's your take?

About Jude Terror

A prophecy says that in the comic book industry's darkest days, a hero will come to lead the people through a plague of overpriced floppies, incentive variant covers, #1 issue reboots, and super-mega-crossover events.

Scourge of Rich Johnston, maker of puns, and seeker of the Snyder Cut, Jude Terror, sadly, is not the hero comics needs right now... but he's the one the industry deserves.

twitter   envelope   globe