[SPOILERS] Geoffrey Rush Talks The Twist In Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales

pirates5There was kind of a big twist at the end of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales that will either really work for you or it really won't. I didn't address it in my review directly, but it's pretty blatant in that review that I didn't like the movie. However, the Pirates movies have always had their set of fans and this twist might be the thing to give an often ignored character, in this case Geoffrey Rush's Captain Barbossa, some much needed character development. Rush talked to Cinema Blend about this twist but to get into it we need to spoil the end of the movie. So if you don't want to be spoiled for the end of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales then please come back another time.

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Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No TalesSo about halfway or more through the movie we find out that Carina Smyth (Kaya Scodelario) is actually Barbossa's long lost daughter. No one bothers to tell her that until the very end of the movie, where Barbossa decides to sacrifice himself to save her life.

It's a bit like the Dickens novels that, episode by episode, happen over a long period of time and the readers have a contribution to it. I liked that there was a kind of surprising secret from the past that he's obviously been sitting on and I kind of looked back on the other four films to go, if I had that knowledge, if the writers hadn't come up with that surprise background secret in his life it all made sense. And I thought 'gee maybe that's where Jack the monkey came from' it's a repressed memory that's found a substitute. Everything made sense.

As any Star Wars fan will tell you, retroactively adding something onto events have that have already happened is not a good way to tell a story. It might be nice to look at the previous movies and try to think that this twist has always been there, which is fine if you want to that, but it doesn't make it play out any less clunky. Henry Turner just so happens to land on the island where Barbossa's daughter just so happens to be. They just so happen to also be there at the same time as Jack Sparrow and they all just so happen to team up to work together because they all just so happen to want the same thing. This kind of character charting makes sense to studio executives but when you think about it for more than two seconds.

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No TalesHowever, Rush does seem to think the twist works and the fact that he likens it to a Dickens novel is pretty accurate and not surprising considering his formal training. The idea that the monkey is there to "fill the void" is cute but the character he is playing has dramatically changed for each movie.

Yeah and even though I wasn't playing those notions. But because he's always been such a transformational character. He's become a politician, he's worked for the King, and now he's a corporate CEO with a vulgarity of wealth, having that slightly more vain narcissistic ruthless survivor character to confront a vulnerability or some hidden emotional core was really great to play in the landscape, the tone, the scale, the big brushstrokes that these stories require.

The idea of trying to put some long term character development over a character that has changes so much over five movies doesn't really work because there isn't any consistency. These are movies that are about pirates and the vastness of the oceans yet they twist themselves into pretzels to make that world feel so small.

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales is out now.

About Kaitlyn Booth

Kaitlyn is the Editor-in-Chief at Bleeding Cool. She loves movies, television, and comics. She's a member of the UFCA and the GALECA. Feminist. Writer. Nerd. Follow her on twitter @katiesmovies and @safaiagem on instagram. She's also a co-host at The Nerd Dome Podcast. Listen to it at http://www.nerddomepodcast.com

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