Star Trek: Discovery "Forget Me Not" Review: Adira Goes on Trill Ride

Star Trek: Discovery - "Forget Me Not"
5/10
Perhaps the weakest episode of season three, "Forget Me Not" reintroduces the Trill and the journey Adira goes through to tap into her previous hosts' memories. This is almost negated by petty squabbles on the ship that should been resolved previously.

This week's Star Trek: Discovery hinged on two storylines. First, Discovery's newest crew member in Adira (Blu del Barrio) comes on board from a very different earth from expected in the future. She underwent a Trill bonding without the rituals and processes typically undergone from willing hosts. Trill, for the uninitiated, is a species comprised of a symbiote and host. The symbiote retains the memories of prior hosts, but Adira is human. So due to the unnatural process she went through, she's unable to tap into the memories of her symbiote's former hosts so Discovery goes to the Trill homeworld to see if they can help.

Star Trek: Discovery "Forget Me Not" Review: Adira Goes on Trill Ride
STAR TREK: DISCOVERY. Photo Cr: Michael Gibson/CBS ©2020 CBS Interactive, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

The second story is how the crew of the U.S.S. Discovery is still coping with the extreme temporal isolation of being trapped in the future knowing their loved ones are lost in the past. While Barrio shines along with Sonequa Martin-Green's Michael Burnham in trying to get Adira's memories back along with wonderful CG laying the groundwork for the journey back, I found the unresolved infighting between the crew to be off-putting. The primary tension lately blew up between Lt. Keyla Detmer (Emily Coutts) and Lt. Cmdr. Paul Stamets (Anthony Rapp).

Star Trek: Discovery "Forget Me Not" Review: Adira Goes on Trill Ride
STAR TREK: DISCOVERY. Photo Cr: Michael Gibson/CBS ©2020 CBS Interactive, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

It seems like the tension between the two is especially unbecoming considering the ridiculous nature of the argument is: who is more important to the operation of the crew. Really?! Of all the petty things to get worked up over, that becomes a driving force of tension. It's one thing if it's an alien influence that tapping and somehow feeding of their microaggressions and inhibitions, but they're all lucid Starfleet officers who served together for numerous years. Meanwhile, Saru (Doug Jones) is almost taking a "kids will be kids" attitude. Michelle Yeoh is just flat out wasted as the outburst would be the perfect opportunity NOT to sit on the sidelines for Emperor Georgiou. It just feels like writers Alan B. McElroy, Chris Silvestri, and Anthony Maranville should have moved on from the lingering tensions or at least worked on some "threat of the week" in the crew than petty squabbles. I'll give credit to Hanelle M. Culpepper for directing the episode in regard to the Trill-related sequences.

Star Trek: Discovery "Forget Me Not" Review: Adira Goes on Trill Ride
STAR TREK: DISCOVERY. Photo Cr: Michael Gibson/CBS ©2020 CBS Interactive, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Guess without the B-storyline of the "crew at each other's throats again," we would have only half an episode. "Forget Me Not" is rather forgettable and a let down for the aforementioned reasons, but it does shine on a species not seen since Deep Space Nine and it's interesting seeing the dynamic of the Trill come into play again in the Star Trek franchise. Star Trek: Discovery streams Thursdays on CBS All Access.


This post is part of a multi-part series: Star Trek: Discovery Season 3: Previous Reviews.

About Tom Chang

I'm a follower of pop culture from gaming, comics, sci-fi, fantasy, film, and TV for over 30 years. I grew up reading magazines like Starlog, Mad, and Fangora. As a professional writer for over 10 years, Star Wars was the first sci-fi franchise I fell in love with. I'm a nerd-of-all-trades.

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