A Holographic History Of The Pokémon TCG: Lowercase Pokémon-ex

Over the years, the Pokémon TCG has featured many different styles used on their holographic cards. Some styles lasted for years, while others had short stays, making them markers for their short time in the franchise. In this next installment of A Holographic History of the Pokémon TCG, let's take a look back at a style of card that of often mistaken for a more modern card style: the Pokémon ex.

Rayquaza, Charizard, & Raichu ex. Credit: Pokémon TCG
Rayquaza, Charizard, & Raichu ex. Credit: Pokémon TCG

The Pokémon-ex style of card is often mistaken for the homonym, Pokémon-EX. EX cards are more modern, as they ran through the Black & White and XY eras, Those featured Pokémon breaking from their border, full card foil, and visual effects. The Full Art versions were textured and used gold linework to outline the Pokémon. Today's topic, the lowercase ex, is much different and much older.

Pokémon-ex, with the "ex" standing for "extra," arrived in EX Ruby & Sapphire in June 2003. This style of card would go on to appear in many sets, running all the way through the EX series era. The card style kept the standard galaxy foil holo pattern but expanded upon it, rending the borders in silver foil. This way, the galaxy pattern sparkles on the borders as well. They would go on to be replaced with the LV.X mechanic during the Diamond & Pearl era.

Mew ex. Credit: Pokémon TCG
Mew ex. Credit: Pokémon TCG

During the EX era and the e-series era that preceded it, the Pokémon TCG's popularity had fallen. This led to lower print runs on some sets, which makes some of these cards quite valuable now that there are many collectors looking back through the hobby's history in hopes to complete older sets. Sets such as EX Team Rocket Returns, EX Deoxys, EX Unseen Forces, EX Holon Phantoms, and EX Dragon Frontiers would all take many thousands of dollars to complete due to the value that the bigger hits retain.

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About Theo Dwyer

Theo Dwyer writes about comics, film, and games.
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