Magic: The Gathering Ulamog, The Ceaseless Hunger Commander Tech

Have you ever wanted to smash serious face in Magic: The Gathering's "most popular format", Commander, but didn't want to commit to a single color at all? Has the notion of tentacles firmly wrapped itself around the deckbuilding part of your brain, literally or otherwise? Well fret not, friends, for we have written up a deck tech that's geared especially for you (also, you might want to see someone if madness ensues. You know, on account of the tentacles).

Magic: The Gathering Ulamog, The Ceaseless Hunger Commander Tech
High-resolution art of Ulamog, the Ceaseless Hunger, a fearsome legendary creature from Magic: The Gathering's Battle For Zendikar set. Illustrated by Michael Komarck.

You can find the deck list for this Commander deck tech on TappedOut by clicking here. Our commander, Ulamog, the Ceaseless Hunger is a commander that is not to be taken at all lightly. The Eldrazi titan known as Ulamog is best known for having destroyed a majority of the landscape of the fictional plane of existence called Zendikar, part of the Magic: The Gathering multiverse. Its abilities reflect as such, as does its profoundly-high mana cost. A majority of this deck is meant to attempt to use Ulamog as an endgame piece, but there are many scary creatures and artifacts in this deck that will act as a win condition just fine as well. However, to that end there is a lot of ramp in the form of cheap artifacts and creatures that can bring Ulamog (or anything else) out very quickly, if we are lucky. Here is an abridged showcase of some of the strongest cards in the deck, for the purposes of its strategy:

Metalworker, an artifact creature from Magic: The Gathering's Urza's Destiny expansion.
Metalworker, an artifact creature from Magic: The Gathering's Urza's Destiny expansion.

Metalworker

Although Metalworker is a card with a high premium for price because of its place on the Reserved List, it is justifiably so. If Metalworker is allowed to tap for its mana ability, that very turn might see Ulamog enter play. Without prior ramp, this could be as early as turn four! That's not to even mention what happens if Metalworker comes out sooner or gets haste from a set of Lightning Greaves or Swiftfoot Boots.

Null Brooch, an artifact from Magic: The Gathering's Exodus expansion set.
Null Brooch, an artifact from Magic: The Gathering's Exodus expansion set.

Null Brooch

Null Brooch is a card that will make your opponents seethe with frustration, especially if your hand is empty. It is meant to act as a prolific control piece, countering your opponents' noncreature spells until the cows come home… Or until they lose. This level of disruption does cost a lot for you, but there are ways to mitigate these losses, including…

Crucible of Worlds, an artifact card originally from Magic: The Gathering's Fifth Dawn expansion, here seen from the Core 2019 set.
Crucible of Worlds, an artifact card originally from Magic: The Gathering's Fifth Dawn expansion, here seen from the Core 2019 set.

Crucible of Worlds

Crucible of Worlds is a card that will allow you to cut any land-based losses from Null Brooch, but it will also make your opponents suffer by allowing you to replay lands that can be sacrificed for a great many results. Strip Mine, Wasteland, or Field of Ruin all destroy opposing lands. Throne of the High City makes you the Monarch and thus assists in card draw, and Buried Ruin can bring back artifacts, all by the way of a simple sacrifice. Crucible of Worlds gets any and all of these back and is essential to keeping opponents as in-check as can be.

Wandering Archaic, a new creature card from Magic: The Gathering's Strixhaven: School of Mages expansion set. Not shown: Explore the Vastlands, the flipside of this card.
Wandering Archaic, a new creature card from Magic: The Gathering's Strixhaven: School of Mages expansion set. Not shown: Explore the Vastlands, the flipside of this card.

Wandering Archaic

We do not need to explore the rear face of Wandering Archaic. Explore the Vastlands, as a Magic: The Gathering card, is vastly inferior to Wandering Archaic and will not be considered for this Commander deck's strategy. However, its front face is more than enough to compensate for the lack of sticking power that Explore the Vastlands exhibits. This deck is woefully underequipped with non-permanent cards. There are not a whole lot of instants or sorceries in the colorless arsenal. So, with Wandering Archaic, ideally, we will be able to use the opponents' spells to our advantage.

Overall, this Commander deck is strong, disgustingly so. Sadly, at a roughly $1000+ USD price stage for single copies of cards in the deck, the build is also disgustingly expensive nowadays. If you have thoughts about using Ulamog, the Ceaseless Hunger in a Magic: The Gathering deck, let us know what you think in the comments below!

Ulamog, the Ceaseless Hunger, a legendary creature from Magic: The Gathering's Battle For Zendikar set and the commander of this deck.
Ulamog, the Ceaseless Hunger, a legendary creature from Magic: The Gathering's Battle For Zendikar set and the commander of this deck.

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About Joshua Nelson

Josh Nelson is a Magic: The Gathering deckbuilding savant, a self-proclaimed scholar of all things Sweeney Todd, and, of course, a writer for Bleeding Cool. In their downtime, Josh can be found painting models, playing Magic, or possibly preaching about the horrors and merits of anthropophagy. You can find them on Twitter at @Burning_Inquiry for all your burning inquiries.
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