The Cards Of Pokémon TCG: Celestial Storm – Top Five Cards

Bleeding Cool's journey through the Sun & Moon era of the Pokémon TCG continues. Now that our spotlight series has moved through the first seven sets of this block (Sun & Moon base, Guardians Rising, Burning Shadows, Crimson Invasion, Ultra Prism, Shining Legends, and Forbidden Light), now it's time to look at the next set from this era: Sun & Moon – Celestial Storm was released on August 3rd, 2018. This set has some interesting focuses including the expansion's mascot of the Dragon-type Rayquaza, the Hoenn Starters, and Kanto Pokémon. This set also continued the inclusion of Prism Star cards which could be pulled by lucky collectors in the reverse holo slot. Today, with our breakdown of the set wrapped, I'll count down my personal picks for the top five cards of the set.

Celestial Storm cards. Credit: Pokémon TCG
Celestial Storm cards. Credit: Pokémon TCG
  • 5 – Bellsprout: A Common card makes the top five?! I absolutely love this card, which kicks off Sun & Moon – Celestial Storm with a light Kanto focus. The storybook, pastoral style of the artwork is perfect for Bellsprout, who has never looked cuter than in this group shot. My favorite is the Bellsprout in the back whose head is lolling around. Dude is absolutely out to lunch.
  • 4 – Lisia Full Art Trainer Supporter: Now, this is currently the most valuable card in the set. This deserves a shoutout because it shows how this set was impacted by the historic "waifu" craze that drove up the value of certain Sun & Moon sets. Probably the biggest examples are the Lillie from Sun & Moon – Ultra Prism, this card, and the Rosa from Sun & Moon – Cosmic Eclipse. If we want to get into Japanese cards, too, the never-adapted Sightseer Full Art from Tag Team GX All-Star is the ultimate card impacted by that craze, as it has shot up over the value of any English Sun & Moon-era card. Now, the Lisia card itself is cool, with stunning colors and vibrant artwork that is indicative of the current style of Full Art trainers. You know what, though? To me, it's still not the best Full Art Trainer into the set. Keep reading to see who takes the first slot, because while we have to give Lisia her clout due to her victory over Rayquaza as the chase card, my ultimate pick has nothing to do with value.
  • 3 – Rayquaza GX: The set mascot, Rayquaza dazzles in even its standard GX. This style of card had a tendency to look a bit too computer-generated, but that isn't a problem here. Rayquaza soars over the planet earth in what is one of the best-looking standard GXs.
Celestial Storm cards. Credit: Pokémon TCG
Celestial Storm cards. Credit: Pokémon TCG
  • 2 – Rayquaza GX Rainbow Rare: Simple and elegant, it has the makings of an all-time great chase card. It remains one of the most valuable cards of Sun & Moon – Celestial Storm as the era's rarest Rayquaza card.
  • 1 – Copycat Full Art Trainer Supporter: Copycat takes it! A unique and fun card, this is a Full Art Trainer that has a sense of humor. What makes it the top card of the set for me, though, is how it follows through on one of the most subtle and honorable focuses on Celestial StormCelestial Storm pulls artwork from previous trainer cards, including this one, and uses that exact same illustration for the standard card. It's the Full Arts that are special, as they take the exact set-up and clothing of the original Trainer card and give them the Full Art treatment. This expansion is big on its tributes to Pokémon TCG history and this card does its best as it nods to the original Ken Sugimori take on Copycat.

Stay tuned for the continuing journey through Pokémon TCG: Sun & Moon – Celestial Storm. To look back on this series, click the Celestial Storm tag below. Next time, this journey concludes with a complete expansion review.

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About Theo Dwyer

Theo Dwyer writes about comics, film, and games.
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