Wyrd Games' Seeking The Blade Malifaux 3rd Ed Boxed Set, In Review

Hello to all fans, players, and other aficionados of Malifaux, the tabletop skirmish wargame by Wyrd Games! We have been seeing an absolute proliferation of Master title models for the third edition of this game ever since Wyrd Games came out with the book Malifaux Burns, which put every title into the limelight and gave players all-new choices to make concerning their hiring processes and decisions. We ourselves got a review copy of Seeking the Blade, a boxed set of Master titles to choose between, from among the Outcast and Resurrectionist/Ten Thunders factions. Here's what we think about it!

The front face of the box for Seeking the Blade, a boxed set for the third edition of Malifaux, a tabletop skirmish game by Wyrd Games.
The front face of the box for Seeking the Blade, a boxed set for the third edition of Malifaux, a tabletop skirmish game by Wyrd Games.

So, looking at this line of boxes, each one contains a new iteration of each of two Master models (of differing factions) for Malifaux, as well as one Enforcer model that can be used with either Master in their keywords. In the Seeking the Blade boxed set, that means we have Yan Lo, The Spirit Walker as one Master, Viktoria Chambers, Twin Blades as the other Master, and Kenshiro, the Tactician, as the Ancestor/Mercenary link between the two, usable as an Enforcer for either keyword.

The back face of the box for Seeking the Blade, a boxed set for the third edition of Malifaux, a tabletop skirmish game by Wyrd Games.
The back face of the box for Seeking the Blade, a boxed set for the third edition of Malifaux, a tabletop skirmish game by Wyrd Games.

As seems rather customary for Wyrd's models, at least in the context of Malifaux, these miniatures do not come preassembled and are remarkably dynamic. However, this is a downside as the scale tends to lend itself poorly to remarkable difficulty in assembly. Now, don't get us wrong – they're beautiful miniatures and can absolutely be assembled – but more often than not we find ourselves swearing left and right as some plastic arm or another falls to the floor while we are busy attempting to attach a blade or a parasol (note: the difficulty expressed here is very apparent in the "Realm Beyond" boxed set for The Dreamer, Insomniac and Asami Tanaka, Shintaku, especially when looking at the Lady Yume model – but that is expressly for another article).

Ultimately, it is clear to us that the Master title experiment that Wyrd Games has conducted for Malifaux is a rousing success for the company and its players alike, and we can only imagine what it'll mean for the future of later editions of the game. What do you think? Have you had success with the new titles for Masters in the context of this game? Let us know in the comments below!

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About Joshua Nelson

Josh Nelson is a Magic: The Gathering deckbuilding savant, a self-proclaimed scholar of all things Sweeney Todd, and, of course, a writer for Bleeding Cool. In their downtime, Josh can be found painting models, playing Magic, or possibly preaching about the horrors and merits of anthropophagy. You can find them on Twitter at @Burning_Inquiry for all your burning inquiries.
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