Trainspotting, La La Land, Regal Cinemas to Rerelease Indie Films

As movie theaters struggle to regain footing from a disastrous 2020 film season, chains like Regal Cinemas are trying to find new ways to attract film fans back. Regal announced 10 indie flicks that will return to their Cinema Art theatres looking to attract more than just the art-house crowd. Admission will be discounted at $5 for adults and $3 for children. The films (two of them by Wes Anderson, Damien Chazelle, and Danny Boyle) featured include Trainspotting, No Country for Old Men, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Slumdog Millionaire, La La Land, Call Me By Your Name, Whiplash, Still Alice, Pain and Glory, and Moonrise Kingdom. Here are the synopses for each film with year and rating. What do you say there, friendo?

Trainspotting, La La Land, Regal Cinemas Discounts on Indie Films
Posters for Trainspotting (1996), No Country for Old Men (2007), The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014), Slumdog Millionaire (2008), La La Land (2016), Call Me By Your Name (2017). Whiplash (2014), Still Alice (2014), Pain and Glory (2019) and Moonrise Kingdom (2012), Images courtesy of The Criterion Collection, Miramax, Searchlight Pictures, Lionsgate, Sony Pictures, and Focus Features

Trainspotting (1996) – Directed by Danny Boyle. Rated R

Heroin addict Mark Renton (Ewan McGregor) stumbles through bad ideas and sobriety attempts with his unreliable friends — Sick Boy (Jonny Lee Miller), Begbie (Robert Carlyle), Spud (Ewen Bremner) and Tommy (Kevin McKidd). He also has an underage girlfriend, Diane (Kelly Macdonald), along for the ride. After cleaning up and moving from Edinburgh to London, Mark finds he can't escape the life he left behind when Begbie shows up at his front door on the lam, and a scheming Sick Boy follows.

No Country for Old Men (2007) – Directed by Ethan and Joel Cohen. Rated R

While out hunting, Llewelyn Moss (Josh Brolin) finds the grisly aftermath of a drug deal. Though he knows better, he cannot resist the cash left behind and takes it with him. The hunter becomes the hunted when a merciless killer named Chigurh (Javier Bardem) picks up his trail. Also looking for Moss is Sheriff Bell (Tommy Lee Jones), an aging lawman who reflects on a changing world and a dark secret of his own, as he tries to find and protect Moss.

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) – Directed by Wes Anderson. Rated R

In the 1930s, the Grand Budapest Hotel is a popular European ski resort, presided over by concierge Gustave H. (Ralph Fiennes). Zero, a junior lobby boy, becomes Gustave's friend and protege. Gustave prides himself on providing first-class service to the hotel's guests, including satisfying the sexual needs of the many elderly women who stay there. When one of Gustave's lovers dies mysteriously, Gustave finds himself the recipient of a priceless painting and the chief suspect in her murder.

Slumdog Millionaire (2008) – Directed by Danny Boyle. Rated R

As 18-year-old Jamal Malik (Dev Patel) answers questions on the Indian version of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire," flashbacks show how he got there. Part of a stable of young thieves after their mother dies, Jamal and his brother, Salim, survive on the streets of Mumbai. Salim finds the life of crime agreeable, but Jamal scrapes by with small jobs until landing a spot on the game show.

La La Land (2016) – Directed by Damien Chazelle. Rated PG-13

Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) and Mia (Emma Stone) are drawn together by their common desire to do what they love. But as success mounts they are faced with decisions that begin to fray the fragile fabric of their love affair, and the dreams they worked so hard to maintain in each other threaten to rip them apart.

Call Me By Your Name (2017) – Directed by Luca Guadagnino. Rated R

It's the summer of 1983, and precocious 17-year-old Elio Perlman is spending the days with his family at their 17th-century villa in Lombardy, Italy. He soon meets Oliver, a handsome doctoral student who's working as an intern for Elio's father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of their surroundings, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.

Whiplash (2014) – Directed by Damien Chazelle. Rated R

Andrew Neiman (Miles Teller) is an ambitious young jazz drummer, in pursuit of rising to the top of his elite music conservatory. Terence Fletcher (J.K. Simmons), an instructor known for his terrifying teaching methods, discovers Andrew and transfers the aspiring drummer into the top jazz ensemble, forever changing the young man's life. But Andrew's passion to achieve perfection quickly spirals into obsession, as his ruthless teacher pushes him to the brink of his ability and his sanity.

Still Alice (2014) – Directed by Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland. Rated PG-13

Dr. Alice Howland (Julianne Moore) is a renowned linguistics professor at Columbia University. When words begin to escape her and she starts becoming lost on her daily jogs, Alice must come face-to-face with a devastating diagnosis: early-onset Alzheimer's disease. As the once-vibrant woman struggles to hang on to her sense of self for as long as possible, Alice's three grown children must watch helplessly as their mother disappears more and more with each passing day.

Pain and Glory (2019) – Directed by Pedro Almodóvar. Rated R

A film director reflects on the choices he's made in life as the past and present come crashing down around him.

Moonrise Kingdom (2012) – Directed by Wes Anderson. Rated PG-13

The year is 1965, and the residents of New Penzance, an island off the coast of New England, inhabit a community that seems untouched by some of the bad things going on in the rest of the world. Twelve-year-olds Sam (Jared Gilman) and Suzy (Kara Hayward) have fallen in love and decide to run away. But a violent storm is approaching the island, forcing a group of quirky adults (Bruce Willis, Edward Norton, Bill Murray) to mobilize a search party and find the youths before calamity strikes.

About Tom Chang

I'm a follower of pop culture from gaming, comics, sci-fi, fantasy, film, and TV for over 30 years. I grew up reading magazines like Starlog, Mad, and Fangora. As a professional writer for over 10 years, Star Wars was the first sci-fi franchise I fell in love with. I'm a nerd-of-all-trades.

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