WarnerMedia Looking to FanDome-inate Virtual Convention Scene?

If you jumped online for WarnerMedia's DC FanDome on August 22nd, it would be safe to say that you weren't alone. In fact, according to the multimedia corporation, there were approximately 21,999,999 other people joining you over the course of the online event's 24 hours. Since we're playing the numbers game, you were also sharing the experience globally as viewers from 220 countries and territories tuned in (with DC FanDome trending on Twitter in 53 markets and on YouTube in 82 markets). As for what viewers were treated to and what released that day, film, television, and video game trailers for projects such as Wonder Woman 1984, The Batman, Justice League: The Snyder Cut, and more had generated more than 150 million views in the past week.

DC FanDome | Teaser Trailer
Image: WarnerMedia

So it doesn't come as any surprise that WarnerMedia would be looking to trademark "HBO FanDome," "Max FanDome," "Warner FanDome," "Warner Bros FanDome," "Warner Media FanDome," "HBO Max FanDome," and "HBO FanDome" (via Home Box Office Inc., Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., and Warner Media LLC). On one hand, it makes sense because the company can stockpile those trademarks to make sure there are no shenanigans when it comes to non-WarnerMedia entities looking to create a little "name brand" confusion. Think of it in terms of how U.S. presidential campaigns will lock down every website URL variation possible for a candidate, their motto/slogan, etc. (unless your motto's "Keep America Great" but you let your opponent grab the domain from you).

On the other hand, even if you want to say there was some "creative bookkeeping," there's no denying that WarnerMedia got everything and more that they wanted out of the first DC FanDome. Why wouldn't it make sense to create a series of "FanDome" events built around different aspects of the company? Separate HBO Max and Warner Bros film sessions would make sense- and looking beyond what's below, why not one for Warner Bros TV Group?

WarnerMedia Looking to FanDome-inate Virtual Convention Scene?
A look at WarnerMedia "FanDome" trademark efforts (screencap)
WarnerMedia Looking to FanDome-inate Virtual Convention Scene?
A look at WarnerMedia "FanDome" trademark efforts (screencap)
WarnerMedia Looking to FanDome-inate Virtual Convention Scene?
A look at WarnerMedia "FanDome" trademark efforts (screencap)
WarnerMedia Looking to FanDome-inate Virtual Convention Scene?
A look at WarnerMedia "FanDome" trademark efforts (screencap)

Speaking with Variety earlier this week, Warner Bros. TV Group president and chief marketing officer Lisa Gregorian was already expressing the company's interest in going the DC FanDome route again- though not at expense of having a presence at physical conventions when they return. "There's a place for both," says Gregorian. "I don't think one negates the other. I just think that under the circumstances that we were in we were able to come up with a solution for how to stay connected with our fans."

In the same article, Gregorian also explained why the once all-encompassing DC Fandome ended up being split into two sessions: August 22nd and September 12th. The short answer: there was just too much to cover in one day. "I think there was a certain point where Blair and I were just saying, 'There is just so much programming,'" said Gregorian. Next month's DC FanDome: Explore the Multiverse will differ from the August session in that it will be an on-demand event, with all panels and programming going live at once, giving viewers the ability to curate their own virtual con experience over 24 hours.

About Ray Flook

Serving as Television Editor since 2018, Ray began five years earlier as a contributing writer/photographer before being brought onto the core BC team in 2017.

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