Fanboy Wrampage: Tony Khan vs. Ryan Satin Over Crowd Direction

AEW President Tony Khan and WWE-affiliated dirt sheet mogul Ryan Satin found themselves in a contentious Twitter exchange over the direction of wrestling crowds in WWE and AEW. It all started when Satin took to Twitter to compare Khan's speech to the live crowd before Thursday's episode of Dynamite, which asked them not to chant cuss words, to WWE instructing fans on when to cheer and boo in the Thunderdome.

AEW President Tony Khan knows you have to dress for the job you want, not the job you have.
AEW President Tony Khan knows you have to dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

"Wonder if the people who compared WWE to a North Korean regime for asking the virtual crowd to cheer will say the same thing about AEW asking the crowd not to curse at a wrestling show. Doubt it," Satin tweeted, defending the company for which he worked as an on-air correspondent in WWE Backstage and which continues to pass him scoops, many of which present WWE's spin under the guise of backstage gossip. Satin continued, "Also, I'm not criticizing AEW for this. I'm saying both are totally normal things to do when producing a live wrestling show, and the double standard is confusing to me."

This prompted a response from Khan, who wrote, "They're 2 completely different things, I think." Satin replied, "How so? Both are trying to influence how the crowd reacts to a certain degree for television purposes." And Khan answered, "Because I wasn't telling them when or what to chant, I was asking them not to chant profanity, so we don't get fined….. It's not even similar, man."

Changing the subject of whether the two were similar, Satin pressed Khan on his claim that the directive came from the network, tweeting, "Since Dynamite airs on cable, who does the fine come from? The FCC's profanity rules don't govern cable, and multiple performers say obscenities on Dynamite. Wouldn't the crowd chanting holy shit not really be an issue?"

"The network specifically asked me not to let the crowd chant that, and I'm a good cooperative media partner," Khan replied.

Satin then said, presumably with a straight face (it's Twitter so you can't really see someone's face, which is a shame considering how handsome Satin is), "Totally understandable. To be fair, though, the networks also wanted WWE to have an active crowd in what is generally not an active situation (watching from home). So it comes across better on TV, and they're being a good cooperative media partner too. So it does seem comparable."

Does it, though? Let us know what you think. Was Tony Khan right, or was Ryan Satin, right? The fate of the wrestling world may hinge on your vote.

 

Fanboy Rampage was a blog by Graeme "Graham" McMillan dedicated to the funniest, most ludicrous, and most inappropriate comic book back-and-forths online. McMillan has moved on now, becoming a proper journalist for the likes of The Hollywood Reporter and Wired, but he gave permission to Bleeding Cool to revive his great creation. Now, we've brought this creation into the world of sports entertainment as Fanboy Wrampage.

About Jude Terror

A prophecy once said that in the comic book industry's darkest days, a hero would come to lead the people through a plague of overpriced floppies, incentive variant covers, #1 issue reboots, and super-mega-crossover events.

Sadly, that prophecy was wrong. Oh, Jude Terror was right. For ten years. About everything. But nobody listened. And so, Jude Terror has moved on to a more important mission: turning Bleeding Cool into a pro wrestling dirt sheet!

twitter   envelope   globe