Vince McMahon Refused to Talk to Matt Hardy Before He Left WWE

Before Matt Hardy was willing to sign a new contract with WWE in 2019, all he wanted was to have a conversation with Vince McMahon about his creative direction. However, though the company offered Hardy more and more money, a conversation with Vince was apparently not on the table. In an interview with the New York Post, Hardy explains what led him to leave the company and sign with AEW.

I'm pretty sure what happened (laughs) was, to back it up seven, eight, nine months before my contract was up they tried to get me to re-sign. They offered me a great amount of money and then I just said it's very important. I want to speak to Vince (McMahon). I only have a few years left to do this. I want to be creative. I want to have input. I want to do stuff that I enjoy. I'm not here because I need the money now.

I'm passionate about what I'm doing. I want to be somewhere I enjoy and then I never got a conversation, I never got a conversation and then they offered me more money and then they offered me more money. I just said no, this creative thing is very important to me. I'm not here just to collect a check. I'm here because I'm passionate about this and I want to make these last few years great. I want to enjoy what I'm doing for the remainder of time I can do it.

WWE chairman Vince McMahon at the Wrestlemania Press Conference in New York's Hard Rock Cafe on March 26, 2008. Editorial credit: George Koroneos / Shutterstock.com
WWE chairman Vince McMahon at the Wrestlemania Press Conference in New York's Hard Rock Cafe on March 26, 2008. Editorial credit: George Koroneos / Shutterstock.com

Matt Hardy paints a different picture of AEW owner Tony Khan, who he says is willing to work with the wrestlers on the creative vision. Additionally, he believes Tony Khan has his finger on the pulse of the 2020 pro wrestling fan.

I'm pretty sure what happened (laughs) was, to back it up seven, eight, nine months before my contract was up they tried to get me to re-sign. They offered me a great amount of money and then I just said it's very important. I want to speak to Vince (McMahon). I only have a few years left to do this. I want to be creative. I want to have input. I want to do stuff that I enjoy. I'm not here because I need the money now.

I'm passionate about what I'm doing. I want to be somewhere I enjoy and then I never got a conversation, I never got a conversation and then they offered me more money and then they offered me more money. I just said no, this creative thing is very important to me. I'm not here just to collect a check. I'm here because I'm passionate about this and I want to make these last few years great. I want to enjoy what I'm doing for the remainder of time I can do it.

Read the full interview with Matt Hardy at the New York Post. Hardy also discusses his brother Jeff, the Stadium Stampede match, his broken character, and what he thought about WWE ripping off his cinematic wrestling style.

About Jude Terror

A prophecy says that in the comic book industry's darkest days, a hero will come to lead the people through a plague of overpriced floppies, incentive variant covers, #1 issue reboots, and super-mega-crossover events.

Scourge of Rich Johnston, maker of puns, and seeker of the Snyder Cut, Jude Terror, sadly, is not the hero comics needs right now... but he's the one the industry deserves.

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