Review: Godtear's Styx Boxed Set Release From Steamforged Games

Godtear is a relatively new board game by Steamforged Games. Its Kickstarter campaign concluded in 2018 to great acclaim, and all but one of the campaign's boxed Champion sets have come out. Luckily, we got ahold of a review copy of that Champion, Styx, from Steamforged Games, and here's what we think of him and his hounds!

The front lid of the box for Styx, an upcoming Champion release from Steamforged Games' skirmisher board game Godtear.
The front lid of the box for Styx, an upcoming Champion release from Steamforged Games' skirmisher board game Godtear.

It appears to us that Styx comes with probably the fewest possible miniatures in his boxed set: the release is comprised of Styx himself, his Banner, and two Abyssal Hounds. With an even smaller roster than Luella (a Maelstrom Champion that we covered in review just yesterday), it seems that Styx likely has fewer of those crucial activation opportunities than she does. In a game that lasts only a fixed number of turns, that action resource economy seems pretty dire for his pilot.

The rear side of the box for Styx, an upcoming Champion from the skirmisher Godtear, by Steamforged Games.
The rear side of the box for Styx, an upcoming Champion from the skirmisher Godtear, by Steamforged Games.

Being that we are very new to Godtear, it is hard for us to judge this seemingly elite box by what little we know of what Styx can actually do, but it's a good idea for us to stress the importance of resource economy in timed wargames like this. Elite warbands/crews/armies are often quite powerful, but in a space where the amount of things a player can do is limited by a timespan of N amount of turns, elites get sort of tough to use effectively against a more wide warband.

The contents of Styx's boxed set for the skirmish game Godtear by Steamforged Games.
The contents of Styx's boxed set for the skirmish game Godtear by Steamforged Games.

All in all, the best way we can gauge Styx right now is really via his aesthetics. Psychopomps are neat in any setting and Steamforged Games seemed to derive Syx's aesthetic from the best parts of a bunch of them, so that's a huge plus. Have you gotten a chance to play Godtear? Does the game end up being fun to play? Let us know what you think of it in the comments below!

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About Joshua Nelson

Josh Nelson is a Magic: The Gathering deckbuilding savant, a self-proclaimed scholar of all things Sweeney Todd, and, of course, a writer for Bleeding Cool. In their downtime, Josh can be found painting models, playing Magic, or possibly preaching about the horrors and merits of anthropophagy. You can find them on Twitter at @Burning_Inquiry for all your burning inquiries.
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